How do Wind Turbines Work?

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Wind turbines are large machines that extract energy from the wind and convert it into electricity. The blades on a wind turbine rotate at high speeds, capturing the kinetic energy from the wind and converting it into rotational energy. This energy is then transferred to a generator, which converts it into electricity. Wind turbines can be used to generate electricity for homes, businesses, and even entire communities.

Wind turbines come in a variety of sizes, with the most common being between 50 and 100 feet tall. The blades on a wind turbine can also vary in size, with the most common being between 40 and 50 feet long. The size of a wind turbine will determine its power output and how much electricity it can generate.

Wind turbines can be used to generate both on-grid and off-grid electricity. On-grid wind turbines are connected to the electric grid and can provide power to homes and businesses when the wind is blowing. Off-grid wind turbines are not connected to the electric grid and are typically used to power remote locations or for backup power.

Wind turbines require wind speeds of at least 10 mph to generate electricity. The wind speed at which a wind turbine operates is known as the rated wind speed. The rated wind speed is different for each wind turbine and is determined by the manufacturer.

Wind turbines can be located onshore or offshore. Onshore wind turbines are typically located in rural areas, while offshore wind turbines are located in bodies of water.

Wind turbines have a variety of applications, including generating electricity, pumping water, and grinding grain.

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