C-named plants shrubs trees | 10 plants, shrubs and trees beginning with C

10 Popular Plants, Shrubs and Trees Beginning with C

Dive into the world of flora with our guide to the top 10 exotic plants and trees starting with ‘C’. Unearth unique characteristics, expert care tips, and more. Start your botanical journey with FreshKit today!

Share this to:

In this article, we’ll explore some of the most popular and stunning plants found in gardens across the UK. From the delicate Cherry Blossom and cheerful Chrysanthemum to the majestic Cedar and hardy Crab Apple, each of these plants has unique features and requires specific care to thrive. We’ll give you the essential info on each plant, including their ideal growing conditions, care instructions, pruning and planting seasons.

We’ll also delve into their cultural significance and history, as well as provide links to further resources for readers who are interested in learning more. So whether you’re looking to start a new garden or simply want to expand your knowledge of the flora in the UK, read on and discover the beauty of these wonderful plants.

Cherry blossom

The cherry blossom is a deciduous tree that is known for its stunning pink or white flowers that bloom in early spring. The flowers are often associated with the traditional Japanese custom of hanami, which involves picnicking under cherry blossom trees. The tree can grow up to 20 meters tall and prefers a sunny location with well-drained soil.

Cherry Blossom
Photo by Bagus Pangestu: Source
  • Genus: Prunus
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Ideal conditions: Cherry Blossom thrives in a sunny position, but it can also grow in partially shaded areas. It prefers well-drained soil that is slightly acidic. It does not do well in wet or heavy soil.
  • Light levels: It requires full sun to thrive, but it can also tolerate some shade.
  • Soil type: It prefers well-drained, slightly acidic soil. It can tolerate most soil types but will not grow well in heavy or wet soils.
  • Garden position: Cherry Blossom is a popular ornamental tree that can be grown in gardens, parks, and public spaces. It looks stunning when planted in groups or used as a focal point in a garden.
  • Flowering season: It typically blooms in the spring, starting in March or April, depending on the location and weather conditions.
  • Pruning season: It’s best pruned after it has finished blooming in the spring. This is when the tree is in its dormant state, and it will be less stressful on the tree.
  • Planting season: Cherry Blossom can be planted in the autumn or spring when the soil is not frozen. This will give the tree time to establish its roots before the hot summer weather arrives.
  • Care instructions: It requires regular watering, especially during hot and dry weather. It should be fertilized once a year with a balanced fertilizer. Pruning is essential to maintain the tree’s shape and health.
  • Hardiness: It’s hardy in USDA zones 5-8, but some cultivars can survive in zone 4. It is important to choose a cultivar that is suitable for the climate in your area.

Cherry blossom has a long and rich cultural significance, particularly in Japan, where it is known as sakura. The blossoming season, known as hanami, is a cherished event that has been celebrated for centuries. It marks the beginning of spring, when the delicate pink and white blossoms emerge, creating a stunning display that lasts only a few weeks.

Blossom

The Japanese have a deep appreciation for the ephemeral nature of cherry blossoms, seeing it as a reminder to live in the present and to appreciate the beauty of life. Cherry blossoms have also been used in Japanese art and literature for centuries, appearing in poetry, and paintings, and as a symbol of the impermanence of life.

Cherry blossoms have also become an international symbol of friendship, as the Japanese government has gifted cherry blossom trees to countries around the world as a symbol of goodwill. In the US, the National Cherry Blossom Festival is held annually in Washington, D.C. to commemorate the gift of 3,000 cherry trees from Japan to the United States in 1912.

The cultural significance of cherry blossoms extends beyond Japan and the US, with the beautiful blooms being celebrated in many other countries around the world, including Korea, China, and the UK.

Cherry blossom FAQs

  1. How to plant a cherry blossom tree:
  • Choose a location with full sun exposure and well-draining soil.
  • Dig a hole that is wider and slightly shallower than the tree’s root ball.
  • Place the tree in the hole, ensuring the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface.
  • Backfill the hole with soil and firm the soil around the base of the tree.
  • Water thoroughly.
  1. How to prune a cherry blossom tree:
  • Remove any dead, damaged, or diseased branches.
  • Thin out any branches that are crossing or rubbing against each other.
  • Remove any water sprouts (vigorous vertical shoots).
  • Shape the tree by pruning back branches that are too long or extending beyond the desired shape.
  1. When to prune a cherry blossom tree:
  • Prune cherry blossom trees in late winter or early spring before new growth begins.
  1. How to prune cherry blossom tree:
  • Use clean and sharp pruning tools to make clean cuts.
  • Prune at a 45-degree angle just above a healthy bud or lateral branch.
  1. How long does a cherry blossom tree take to grow:
  • Cherry blossom trees can take up to 10 years to reach their full height and maturity. However, they can begin to produce blossoms after 3 to 5 years.
  1. How to grow a cherry blossom tree from seed:
  • Collect ripe cherry blossom seeds in autumn and plant them in a pot filled with well-draining soil.
  • Keep the soil moist and place the pot in a sunny location.
  • Germination can take up to 3 months.
  • Once the seedlings have grown to a suitable size, they can be transplanted into the ground.
  1. How to take a cutting from a cherry blossom tree:
  • Take a cutting from a healthy cherry blossom tree in late winter or early spring.
  • Use clean and sharp pruning tools to make a clean cut.
  • Dip the cut end in rooting hormone and plant it in a pot filled with well-draining soil.
  • Keep the soil moist and place the pot in a shaded location.
  • Once the cutting has rooted, it can be transplanted into the ground.
  1. How to grow a cherry blossom tree from a branch:
  • Take a branch cutting from a healthy cherry blossom tree in late winter or early spring.
  • Plant the branch cutting in a pot filled with well-draining soil.
  • Keep the soil moist and place the pot in a shaded location.
  • Once the cutting has rooted, it can be transplanted into the ground.
  1. How to save a dying cherry blossom tree:
  • Identify the cause of the problem, such as pests, disease, or lack of water.
  • Treat the problem accordingly.
  • Prune any dead or diseased branches.
  • Ensure the tree is receiving adequate water and nutrients.
  • Apply a slow-release fertiliser in spring.
  1. How to look after a cherry blossom tree:
  • Water regularly, especially during dry spells.
  • Apply a slow-release fertiliser in spring.
  • Prune annually to maintain the tree’s shape and remove any dead or diseased branches.
  • Watch for signs of pests or diseases and treat them accordingly.
Show More Show Less

Clematis

Clematis is a climbing plant that produces an abundance of flowers in a wide range of colours, including purple, pink, red, white, and yellow. The flowers bloom from late spring to early autumn, depending on the variety. Clematis prefers a sunny location with well-drained soil and needs support to climb.

Clematis
  • Genus: Clematis
  • Family: Ranunculaceae
  • Ideal conditions: Clematis prefer well-drained soil that is rich in organic matter. They also require good air circulation, which means they should not be planted too close together or near walls or other obstructions. They grow best in full sun or partial shade, depending on the variety.
  • Light levels: Clematis can tolerate partial shade, but they prefer full sun for at least six hours a day.
  • Soil type: Clematis prefer well-drained soil that is rich in organic matter. They also require a slightly acidic soil pH of around 6.0 to 7.0.
  • Garden position: Clematis are versatile plants that can be grown in containers, trained up trellises, or used to cover walls, fences, or other garden structures.
  • Flowering season: Clematis bloom in late spring or early summer, and again in late summer or early autumn, depending on the variety.
  • Pruning season: Clematis should be pruned according to their group, which is determined by their bloom time. Group 1 clematis bloom on old wood and should be pruned after flowering. Group 2 clematis bloom on both old and new wood and should be lightly pruned in early spring and then deadheaded after the first bloom. Group 3 clematis bloom on new wood and should be pruned in late winter or early spring.
  • Planting season: Clematis can be planted in spring or autumn, but they prefer to be planted in cooler weather when they are not actively growing.
  • Care instructions: Clematis should be watered deeply and regularly, especially during the first growing season. They also benefit from regular fertilization and a layer of mulch to help retain moisture and keep the soil cool. Clematis can be prone to pests and diseases, so it’s important to monitor them for any signs of damage and treat them accordingly.
  • Hardiness: Clematis are hardy in USDA zones 3 to 9 and in RHS H2 hardiness rating. Some varieties are more cold-hardy than others, so it’s important to choose a variety that is suited to your climate.

Clematis has a long and interesting history, with a rich cultural significance that varies from region to region. Here are a few notable examples:

  • In ancient China, clematis was highly valued for its medicinal properties and was used to treat a wide variety of ailments, including headaches, arthritis, and skin conditions.
  • In Europe, clematis was highly prized as an ornamental plant, and its popularity peaked during the Victorian era. It was often used to decorate fences and walls, and many different cultivars were developed.
  • In the language of flowers, clematis is said to represent mental beauty and symbolises artifice or ingenuity. It is also associated with intuition and creativity.
  • In some Native American cultures, clematis was used as a spiritual symbol and was believed to have protective powers. It was often used in ceremonies and rituals to ward off evil spirits.

Today, clematis remains a popular plant in gardens all over the world, admired for its showy flowers and versatility in a wide range of garden settings.

Clematis FAQs

  1. How to prune clematis:
  • Prune clematis according to the group it belongs to. Group 1 does not require pruning, Group 2 requires minimal pruning, and Group 3 requires hard pruning.
  • Remove any dead or damaged wood.
  • Cut back the remaining stems to the desired height, making sure to leave at least two pairs of healthy buds on each stem.
  1. When to cut back clematis:
  • The timing of pruning depends on the group to which the clematis belongs. Group 1 is pruned after flowering, Group 2 is pruned in late winter or early spring, and Group 3 is pruned in early spring.
  1. How to treat clematis wilt:
  • Clematis wilt is a fungal disease that can cause leaves and stems to wilt and turn brown.
  • Cut off affected stems and dispose of them.
  • Spray the remaining stems with a fungicide.
  • Ensure the plant is well-watered and fertilized to help it recover.
  1. When to plant clematis:
  • Clematis can be planted in the spring or autumn when the soil is workable and not frozen.
  1. How to propagate clematis:
  • Clematis can be propagated by taking stem cuttings or layering.
  • Take a stem cutting in summer and plant it in a pot filled with well-draining soil.
  • Layer a stem in autumn by bending it to the ground and covering it with soil, leaving the tip exposed.
  1. When to prune clematis:
  • The timing of pruning depends on the group to which the clematis belongs. Group 1 is pruned after flowering, Group 2 is pruned in late winter or early spring, and Group 3 is pruned in early spring.
  1. How to grow clematis from seed:
  • Collect clematis seeds in autumn and plant them in a pot filled with well-draining soil.
  • Keep the soil moist and place the pot in a sunny location.
  • Germination can take up to 3 months.
  • Once the seedlings have grown to a suitable size, they can be transplanted into the ground.
  1. How to plant clematis:
  • Choose a location with full sun to partial shade and well-draining soil.
  • Dig a hole that is wider and slightly deeper than the pot the clematis is in.
  • Place the plant in the hole, ensuring the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface.
  • Backfill the hole with soil and firm the soil around the base of the plant.
  • Water thoroughly.
  1. How to grow clematis:
  • Provide the plant with well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade.
  • Water regularly, especially during dry spells.
  • Apply a slow-release fertilizer in spring.
  • Prune according to the group to which the clematis belongs.
  1. How to plant clematis in a container:
  • Choose a container that is at least 18 inches in diameter and has drainage holes.
  • Fill the container with well-draining soil.
  • Plant the clematis in the centre of the container, making sure the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface.
  • Add a trellis or support for the plant to climb.
  • Water regularly and fertilize with a slow-release fertilizer in spring.
Show More Show Less

Camellia

Camellia is an evergreen shrub that produces beautiful flowers in shades of pink, red, and white in late winter and early spring. The plant prefers a sheltered location with partial shade and well-drained soil. It can be grown in pots or in the ground and is a popular choice for borders and hedges.

Camellia
  • Genus: Camellia
  • Family: Theaceae
  • Ideal conditions: Camellias prefer a cool and moist environment with well-drained soil that is rich in organic matter. They are best planted in a sheltered location that is protected from direct sunlight and strong winds. They also prefer a slightly acidic soil pH between 5.5 and 6.5.
  • Light levels: Camellias thrive in partial shade to filtered light, as direct sunlight can damage the leaves and flowers.
  • Soil type: Camellias prefer well-drained soil that is rich in organic matter, such as loam or sandy soil. They do not tolerate heavy clay soils.
  • Garden position: Camellias are ideal for planting in borders, as specimen plants, or as part of a mixed shrub border. They can also be grown in containers and are well-suited for small gardens.
  • Flowering season: Camellias typically bloom in late winter or early spring, producing showy flowers that can be pink, red, white, or a combination of colours.
  • Pruning season: Camellias should be pruned in late spring or early summer after they have finished flowering. Pruning is usually limited to removing dead, damaged, or diseased wood, as excessive pruning can reduce the number of flowers produced the following season.
  • Planting season: Camellias can be planted in the autumn or early spring. The best time to plant them is when the soil is moist but not waterlogged.
  • Care instructions: Camellias require regular watering to keep the soil moist, particularly during dry periods. They benefit from a regular application of fertilizer during the growing season, and mulching around the base of the plant can help to retain moisture in the soil. Camellias are also susceptible to a range of pests and diseases, including scale insects, aphids, and leaf spot. It is important to monitor the plant for signs of damage and take appropriate action if necessary.
  • Hardiness: Camellias are generally hardy in USDA zones 7 to 9 and RHS H3. Some varieties can tolerate colder temperatures, while others may require protection from frost and cold winds.

Camellias have a long and rich history, particularly in East Asia, where they are native to China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. The flower was first introduced to Europe in the 18th century, where it quickly gained popularity for its delicate beauty and luxurious appearance. Today, camellias are commonly found in gardens all over the world and have even become a popular subject in art and literature.

In East Asia, the camellia flower has long been associated with love and devotion and is often featured in wedding ceremonies and other romantic occasions. In China, the flower is associated with the idea of eternal love and is often given as a gift between couples. In Japan, the camellia is known as the “Tsubaki,” and is highly prized for its beauty and cultural significance. The samurai, for example, often wore the flower as a symbol of bravery and honour.

In addition to their cultural significance, camellias have also played an important role in the development of the tea industry. Camellia sinensis, the species of camellia used to make tea, is native to China and has been cultivated for thousands of years. Today, it is grown all over the world, with some of the most famous tea-growing regions located in Asia.

Camellia FAQs

  1. When the camellia blooms:
  • Camellias typically bloom in late winter to early spring, but the exact timing depends on the specific variety.
  1. Where to plant camellia:
  • Camellias prefer a location with partial shade or filtered light, and protection from hot afternoon sun.
  • They prefer well-draining soil that is slightly acidic, with a pH between 5.0 and 6.5.
  • Camellias can be grown in pots or in the ground.
  1. How to prune a camellia:
  • Camellias should be pruned after flowering.
  • Remove any dead, diseased, or crossing branches.
  • Thin out the centre of the plant to improve air circulation.
  • Shape the plant as desired.
  1. What soil for camellia:
  • Camellias prefer well-draining soil that is slightly acidic, with a pH between 5.0 and 6.5.
  • Mix in organic matter such as compost or leaf mould to improve the soil quality.
  1. When to cut back camellia:
  • Camellias should be pruned after flowering.
  1. Why are my camellia flowers turning brown:
  • Brown or wilted flowers can be caused by overwatering, underwatering, or exposure to extreme temperatures.
  • If the flowers are turning brown before they open, it may be due to bud drop caused by environmental stress.
  1. Why is my camellia not flowering:
  • Camellias may not flower if they are not getting enough light, are exposed to hot afternoon sun, are being overwatered or underwatered, or are not receiving enough nutrients.
  1. How to grow camellia:
  • Camellias prefer partial shade or filtered light, well-draining soil that is slightly acidic, and protection from hot afternoon sun.
  • Water regularly and fertilize with an acidic fertilizer in spring and summer.
  • Prune after flowering.
  1. When to take camellia cuttings UK:
  • Camellia cuttings can be taken in summer or early autumn.
  1. How to look after a camellia in a pot:
  • Camellias can be grown in pots as long as the pot is at least 12 inches in diameter and has good drainage.
  • Use a well-draining potting mix and fertilize with an acidic fertilizer in spring and summer.
  • Water regularly and avoid letting the soil dry out completely.
  • Prune after flowering.
  1. Why are my camellia leaves yellow:
  • Yellowing leaves can be caused by overwatering, underwatering, nutrient deficiencies, or soil that is too alkaline.
  • Test the soil pH and adjust as necessary.
  • Make sure the plant is getting enough water and nutrients.
  1. How do you prune a camellia:
  • Camellias should be pruned after flowering.
  • Remove any dead, diseased, or crossing branches.
  • Thin out the centre of the plant to improve air circulation.
  • Shape the plant as desired.
  1. How to plant a camellia in a pot:
  • Choose a pot that is at least 12 inches in diameter and has good drainage.
  • Use a well-draining potting mix and plant the camellia at the same depth it was growing in its previous container.
  • Water thoroughly and fertilize with an acidic fertilizer in spring and summer.
  • Prune after flowering.
Show More Show Less

Cornus

Cornus is a genus of deciduous shrubs or small trees that produce stunning autumn colours, including red, orange, and yellow. The plant prefers a sunny or partially shaded location with well-drained soil and is commonly used in borders, hedges, and woodland gardens.

Cornus
  • Genus: Cornus
  • Family: Cornaceae
  • Ideal conditions: Cornus generally prefers moist, well-drained soils in full sun to partial shade. They can tolerate a range of soil types, but prefer slightly acidic to neutral soils. Some species prefer more moisture than others, so it’s important to check the specific requirements of the variety you are growing.
  • Light levels: Most Cornus species prefer full sun to partial shade, but some species can tolerate more shade than others.
  • Soil type: Cornus can tolerate a range of soil types, but generally prefer moist, well-drained soils that are slightly acidic to neutral.
  • Garden position: Cornus can be used as specimen plants, in borders or as hedging. They can also be grown in containers.
  • Flowering season: The flowering season varies depending on the species and cultivar, but generally Cornus will produce flowers in spring or early summer.
  • Pruning season: Cornus can be pruned in late winter or early spring before new growth appears.
  • Planting season: The best time to plant Cornus is in the autumn or winter, while the plants are dormant.
  • Care instructions: Cornus requires regular watering, especially during dry periods. They benefit from a layer of mulch around the base of the plant to retain moisture and suppress weeds. Fertiliser can be applied in spring and summer to encourage growth and flowering. Some species may benefit from occasional pruning to remove dead or damaged wood.
  • Hardiness: Cornus species have varying hardiness levels, but many are suitable for growing in the UK and the US. Most are hardy to USDA zones 4-9, while some species can tolerate even colder temperatures. The RHS hardiness rating varies depending on the species, but many are rated H5 (hardy to -10°C to -15°C).

Cornus has a long history of cultural significance in many parts of the world. In ancient China, the bark of the Cornus officinalis was used in traditional medicine to treat various illnesses, including digestive issues and skin problems. In Europe, the bark of the Cornus sanguinea was used to make red dye, and the wood was used to make tools and furniture.

In Native American culture, the bark of the Cornus sericea, also known as red osier dogwood, was used to make a tea to treat colds and fevers. The plant was also used for basket weaving and to make arrows.

Today, Cornus species are widely used in landscape gardening and as ornamental plants in gardens. The bright red or yellow stems of some species, such as the Cornus alba, are popular for adding colour to winter gardens. The flowers and berries of many species are also attractive to birds and other wildlife.

Cornus FAQs

  1. When to prune Cornus:
    Cornus can be pruned in late winter or early spring, while the plant is still dormant. You can also prune after the plant has flowered, which is usually in the late spring or early summer.
  2. How to prune Cornus:
    To prune Cornus, first remove any dead, diseased, or damaged branches. Then, you can shape the plant as desired. If you want to encourage colourful stems, you can cut back some of the older branches to the ground, leaving only the younger, more vibrant stems.
  3. When to plant Cornus:
    Cornus can be planted in the autumn or spring, but it’s generally best to avoid planting during the hottest months of summer.
  4. When to take Cornus cuttings:
    Cornus cuttings are best taken in the summer, from June to August, when the plant is actively growing.
  5. How to plant Cornus:
    To plant Cornus, choose a well-draining location with full or partial sun. Dig a hole that’s slightly larger than the root ball of the plant and plant it at the same depth as it was in its container. Water the plant thoroughly after planting.
  6. How to propagate Cornus:
    Cornus can be propagated by taking stem cuttings or by layering. To take stem cuttings, simply cut a healthy stem in the summer, dip the cut end in rooting hormone, and plant it in a well-draining potting mix. Keep the cutting moist and out of direct sunlight until it has rooted.
  7. What is a Cornus tree:
    Cornus is a genus of woody shrubs and small trees that are known for their colourful stems and showy flowers. They are commonly called dogwoods.
  8. What to plant with Cornus:
    Cornus pairs well with a variety of plants, including ferns, hostas, and other shade-loving perennials. In sunnier locations, you could plant Cornus alongside other shrubs like hydrangeas or roses.
  9. When to coppice Cornus:
    Cornus can be coppiced in late winter or early spring. This involves cutting the plant back to the ground to promote vigorous new growth and colourful stems.
Show More Show Less

Crocus

Crocus is a popular early spring-blooming flower that is available in a wide range of colours, including purple, white, yellow, and pink. The plant prefers a sunny or partially shaded location with well-drained soil and can be grown in pots or in the ground.

Crocus
  • Genus: Crocus
  • Family: Iridaceae
  • Ideal conditions: Crocuses prefer well-drained soil that is rich in organic matter. They prefer cool climates and can tolerate some shade but grow best in full sun.
  • Light levels: Crocuses require full sun to partial shade, depending on the climate.
  • Soil type: Crocuses prefer well-drained soil that is rich in organic matter.
  • Garden position: Crocuses can be planted in various locations in the garden, such as in borders, rock gardens, or as naturalized bulbs in lawns.
  • Flowering season: Crocuses bloom in late winter or early spring, with some species blooming in the autumn.
  • Pruning season: After the flowers have faded and the foliage has turned yellow, the leaves can be cut back to the ground.
  • Planting season: Crocus bulbs should be planted in the autumn, around September or October, in preparation for winter and early spring flowering.
  • Care instructions: Crocuses require minimal maintenance once established but should be watered regularly during dry periods. Fertilizer is not necessary but can be applied in the autumn.
  • Hardiness: Crocuses are hardy in USDA zones 3-8 and RHS H2-H5.

Crocus has a rich history of cultivation and cultural significance. It is believed to have originated in the Mediterranean and Middle East regions and has been cultivated for thousands of years for its beautiful flowers and as a source of saffron.

In ancient Greece and Rome, crocuses were associated with the god of love and were used to make perfumes and as a medicine for various ailments. In the Middle Ages, the crocus was a symbol of the arrival of spring and was used in religious ceremonies.

Today, crocuses are often used as a symbol of hope and renewal and are popular flowers for planting in the autumn to bloom in the spring. They are also commonly used in gardens and as cut flowers, and their bulbs are a popular choice for forcing indoors during the winter months.

The crocus holds a special place in history and continues to be a beloved flower for its beauty and symbolic meaning.

Crocus FAQs

  1. When do crocus bloom:
    Crocuses typically bloom in late winter or early spring, depending on the climate and variety.
  2. When to plant crocus:
    Crocus bulbs are typically planted in the autumn, about 4-6 weeks before the first hard frost.
  3. What is the plural of crocus:
    The plural of crocus is crocuses or croci.
  4. What to do with crocus after flowering:
    After flowering, you can deadhead the spent blooms to encourage the plant to put its energy into bulb development rather than seed production. Once the foliage has turned yellow and died back, you can cut it back to the ground.
  5. What month do crocus flower in the UK:
    Crocus flowers typically appear in the UK in February or March.
  6. Which crocus produces saffron:
    The saffron crocus (Crocus sativus) is the variety of crocus that produces the spice saffron.
  7. How to plant crocus:
    To plant crocus bulbs, dig a hole that’s two to three times deeper than the height of the bulb. Plant the bulb with the pointy end facing up, cover it with soil, and water thoroughly.
  8. How long do crocus blooms last:
    Crocus blooms typically last for about two to three weeks.
  9. How far apart to plant crocus bulbs:
    Crocus bulbs should be planted about 3-4 inches apart.
  10. How to plant crocus in lawn:
    To plant crocus in a lawn, use a special bulb planter or garden trowel to make holes in the turf. Plant the bulbs at the recommended depth, cover with soil, and gently press down the grass.
  11. Crocus bulbs which way up:
    When planting crocus bulbs, the pointy end should face upwards.
  12. When to lift crocus bulbs:
    Crocus bulbs don’t need to be lifted each year, but you can lift and divide the bulbs in the autumn every three to four years to ensure healthy growth.
  13. What to do with crocus in pots after flowering:
    After flowering, you can leave the foliage to die back naturally. Keep the pot in a dry, sheltered spot over the summer, and then start watering again in the autumn to encourage new growth.
  14. How to plant crocus bulbs in pots:
    To plant crocus bulbs in pots, choose a well-draining potting mix and plant the bulbs at the recommended depth. Water thoroughly and place the pot in a cool, dark spot for a few weeks to encourage root growth before moving it to a bright, sunny location.
  15. What spice comes from crocus:
    The spice saffron comes from the stigma of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus).
Show More Show Less

Cotoneaster

Cotoneaster is a genus of evergreen or deciduous shrubs or small trees that produce attractive berries in autumn. The plant prefers a sunny or partially shaded location with well-drained soil and is commonly used in hedges, borders, and ground cover.

Cotoneaster
  • Genus: Cotoneaster
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Ideal conditions: Cotoneaster grows well in well-drained, moist soil, and prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate a wide range of soil types, including sandy, loamy, and clay soils.
  • Light levels: Full sun to partial shade.
  • Soil type: Well-drained, moist soil with a wide range of soil types including sandy, loamy, and clay soils.
  • Garden position: Cotoneaster is versatile and can be grown in borders, rock gardens, and as a ground cover. It is also commonly used for hedging and topiary.
  • Flowering season: Cotoneaster blooms in late spring or early summer, with small white or pink flowers.
  • Pruning season: Cotoneaster can be pruned in late winter or early spring to maintain its shape and encourage new growth.
  • Planting season: Cotoneaster can be planted in the autumn or spring when the soil is not frozen and the weather is cool and moist.
  • Care instructions: Cotoneaster requires regular watering during the growing season, but can tolerate dry spells once established. Fertilize in the spring with a balanced fertilizer. Mulch around the base of the plant to help retain moisture and suppress weeds.
  • Hardiness: USDA zones 4-8, RHS H4 (hardy down to -10°C)

Cotoneaster has been valued for its ornamental and medicinal properties for centuries. The plant’s name is derived from the Latin “cotoneum” meaning “quince,” and “aster” meaning “resembling” due to its resemblance to quince.

In traditional Chinese medicine, cotoneaster berries have been used for their astringent properties to treat diarrhoea and improve digestion. The plant has also been used in Ayurvedic medicine as a remedy for coughs, colds, and fevers.

In terms of ornamental use, cotoneaster is often planted as a ground cover or hedge due to its dense growth habit and attractive foliage. Some species, such as the Cotoneaster lacteus, are prized for their bright red berries, which add colour and interest to winter landscapes.

In Japan, the Cotoneaster pannosus is sometimes used in bonsai cultivation due to its small size and interesting bark texture.

Overall, cotoneaster has a rich history of both medicinal and ornamental use, making it a valuable plant in many cultures.

Cotoneaster FAQs

  1. Cotoneaster when to prune:
    Cotoneaster can be pruned in late winter or early spring before new growth begins, or in the summer after the plant has finished flowering.
  2. How to prune cotoneaster:
    Prune the cotoneaster to maintain its shape, remove any dead or diseased branches, and control its size. Cut back stems to a healthy bud or side branch, or remove them entirely if necessary.
  3. Why do bees like cotoneaster:
    Bees are attracted to the flowers of cotoneaster, which provide a source of nectar and pollen.
  4. When to plant cotoneaster:
    Cotoneaster can be planted in the spring or autumn.
  5. What is cotoneaster:
    Cotoneaster is a genus of deciduous and evergreen shrubs and small trees in the rose family, known for their attractive foliage, flowers, and fruit.
  6. How to pronounce cotoneaster:
    The correct pronunciation of cotoneaster is koh-tuh-nee-aster.
  7. How quickly does cotoneaster grow:
    The growth rate of cotoneaster depends on the specific species and growing conditions, but in general, they are moderate to fast-growing.
  8. What to plant with cotoneaster:
    Cotoneaster can be planted with a variety of plants that have similar growing requirements, such as other shrubs and perennials.
  9. Where to plant cotoneaster:
    Cotoneaster can be planted in a variety of locations, including borders, rock gardens, and slopes.
  10. How to plant cotoneaster:
    Plant cotoneaster in well-drained soil in a location that receives full sun to part shade. Dig a hole that is twice as wide and as deep as the root ball, and backfill with soil, pressing it firmly around the roots. Water thoroughly and mulch the area around the base of the plant.
Show More Show Less

Cypress

Cypress is a coniferous evergreen tree that is known for its elegant shape and beautiful foliage. The tree prefers a sunny location and can grow up to 20 meters tall. It is commonly used in formal gardens and as a hedge.

Cypress Trees
  • Genus: Cupressus
  • Family: Cupressaceae
  • Ideal conditions: Cypress trees prefer full sun and well-draining soil. They can tolerate a wide range of soils, but they do best in slightly acidic soil that is rich in organic matter. They are also drought-tolerant once established.
  • Light levels: Full sun
  • Soil type: Well-draining soil that is slightly acidic and rich in organic matter.
  • Garden position: Cypress trees can be used as specimen trees, hedges, or screens, and are suitable for both large and small gardens.
  • Flowering season: Cypress trees do not produce showy flowers, but they do produce small, round cones that contain seeds.
  • Pruning season: Pruning is best done in late winter or early spring before new growth begins. This allows the tree to recover from any pruning wounds before the new growth starts.
  • Planting season: Cypress trees can be planted in the autumn or spring, but autumn planting is preferred because it allows the tree to establish its root system before the hot summer months.
  • Care instructions: Cypress trees require little maintenance once established. They are drought-tolerant and do not need to be watered frequently. Fertilization is generally not necessary unless the soil is deficient in nutrients. Cypress trees may be susceptible to certain pests and diseases, so regular inspection is recommended.
  • Hardiness: Depending on the species, cypress trees can be hardy in USDA zones 6 through 11 (RHS H4 to H5).

Cypress trees have a long and rich cultural history. In ancient times, they were considered symbols of longevity and immortality due to their long lifespan and evergreen foliage. The cypress was also associated with mourning and the afterlife in many cultures, including ancient Greece and Rome.

In Greek mythology, the cypress was sacred to the goddess Artemis, who was the goddess of the hunt and the moon. The trees were often planted in cemeteries and other places associated with death and the afterlife.

In addition to their cultural and mythological significance, cypress trees have been used for practical purposes for centuries. The wood of the cypress tree is highly valued for its durability and resistance to decay and has been used for building ships, furniture, and other structures.

Today, cypress trees continue to be valued for their beauty and practical uses. They are often used in landscaping and gardening, as well as for building and construction purposes. The cypress is also a popular ornamental tree, with many different varieties available in nurseries and garden centres.

The cypress tree has played an important role in many cultures throughout history and continues to be a beloved and valuable tree today.

Cypress FAQs

  • How tall do cypress trees grow?
    Cypress trees can vary in height depending on the species, but they generally range from 30 to 70 feet tall. Some species, like the Leyland cypress, can grow up to 100 feet tall.
  • What does cypress smell like?
    Cypress has a woody and slightly sweet smell that is often described as fresh and clean.
  • What are cypress trees?
    Cypress trees are evergreen trees that belong to the Cupressaceae family. They are often found in wetlands and swamps and are known for their conical shape, evergreen foliage, and flaky bark.
  • Why is my cypress tree turning brown?
    There are many reasons why a cypress tree may be turning brown, including disease, pest infestation, overwatering, underwatering, and environmental stress. It’s best to consult a local arborist or horticulturist to determine the exact cause of the browning and the appropriate course of action.
  • How to prune a cypress tree?
    Cypress trees generally require very little pruning, but if needed, pruning should be done in late winter or early spring before new growth emerges. It’s best to consult a local arborist or horticulturist for specific pruning advice for the species of cypress you have.
  • What colour is cypress?
    Cypress foliage is typically dark green or blue-green in colour, while the bark can vary from grey to reddish-brown.
  • How to save a dying cypress tree?
    The first step in saving a dying cypress tree is to determine the cause of its decline. If it’s due to pests, disease, or other health issues, it’s best to consult a local arborist or horticulturist for advice on treatment. In some cases, it may be too late to save the tree, but an expert can help you make that determination.
  • What does a cypress tree look like?
    Cypress trees are conical in shape with dense, evergreen foliage and flaky, often shaggy bark. Some species have a distinctive knee-like protrusion near the base of the trunk that grows upward from the roots.
  • When to prune cypress trees?
    Cypress trees should be pruned in late winter or early spring before new growth emerges.
  • How to take care of cypress trees?
    Cypress trees require well-drained soil, regular watering, and occasional fertilisation. They also benefit from mulching to retain moisture and control weeds. It’s important to consult a local arborist or horticulturist for specific care advice for the species of cypress you have.
  • How old do cypress trees get?
    The lifespan of cypress trees varies by species, but many can live for several hundred years. Some of the oldest cypress trees in the world are estimated to be over 1,000 years old.
Show More Show Less

Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemum is a popular autumn-blooming flower that is available in a wide range of colours and sizes. The plant prefers a sunny location with well-drained soil and can be grown in pots or in the ground. It is commonly used in borders, containers, and as cut flowers.

Chrysanthemum
  • Genus: Chrysanthemum
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Ideal conditions: Chrysanthemums prefer full sun to partial shade and well-drained soil with a pH between 6.5 and 7.5. They need regular watering, especially during dry spells.
  • Light levels: Full sun to partial shade
  • Soil type: Well-drained soil with a pH between 6.5 and 7.5
  • Garden position: Chrysanthemums can be grown in beds, borders, containers, and as cut flowers.
  • Flowering season: Chrysanthemums flower in the autumn and come in a wide range of colours, including white, yellow, pink, red, and bronze.
  • Pruning season: Pinch back the growing tips in early summer to encourage bushier growth and more flowers. Deadhead the spent blooms to prolong the flowering period.
  • Planting season: Chrysanthemums are usually planted in the spring or early summer after the danger of frost has passed. They can also be planted in the autumn, but may not have enough time to establish before winter.
  • Care instructions: Chrysanthemums require regular watering and feeding and should be mulched to keep the soil moist and cool. They may need staking to keep the stems upright. In colder areas, they should be protected from frost with a thick layer of mulch or by being lifted and stored over winter.
  • Hardiness: USDA hardiness zones 5-9, RHS hardiness rating H4.

Chrysanthemums, also known as mums, have a rich history and cultural significance in various parts of the world. Here are some highlights:

  • In China, chrysanthemums have been cultivated for more than 2,000 years and are considered one of the Four Gentlemen, a group of plants that represent the four seasons. They are highly respected for their beauty and longevity and are often depicted in art and literature.
  • In Japan, chrysanthemums have been celebrated for over a thousand years and are considered the country’s national flower. They are often depicted in Japanese art, such as paintings, pottery, and textiles. The Imperial Family of Japan also uses a chrysanthemum crest as a symbol of their royalty.
  • In Europe, chrysanthemums were introduced in the 17th century from China and quickly became popular for their showy blooms. They were especially popular in the Victorian era and were often used in formal gardens and as cut flowers.
  • In the United States, chrysanthemums were introduced in the late 18th century and have since become a popular autumn flower. They are often used in autumnal decorations, such as wreaths and centrepieces.
  • In some cultures, chrysanthemums are associated with death and are often used in funeral arrangements. In others, they are a symbol of joy and happiness and are given as gifts to express gratitude and well-wishes.

Chrysanthemums have a long and diverse cultural history, and their beauty and versatility have made them beloved flowers in many parts of the world.

Chrysanthemum FAQs

  1. When does chrysanthemum bloom?
    Chrysanthemums typically bloom in late summer and autumn.
  2. How to grow chrysanthemum?
    Chrysanthemums require well-draining soil and full sun. They are best grown from cuttings or purchased as young plants from a nursery. Regular watering and fertilizing are important for their growth and blooming.
  3. When to plant chrysanthemum?
    Chrysanthemums can be planted in the spring or the autumn.
  4. What does chrysanthemum mean?
    The word “chrysanthemum” comes from the Greek words for “gold” and “flower”. It has various meanings in different cultures but is often associated with friendship, love, and loyalty.
  5. How to take chrysanthemum cuttings?
    Chrysanthemum cuttings should be taken in late spring or early summer from new growth on the plant. Cuttings should be taken from healthy, disease-free plants and placed in a rooting hormone before being planted in well-draining soil.
  6. What does a chrysanthemum look like?
    Chrysanthemums come in a variety of colours and shapes, but they typically have large, showy flowers with many petals.
  7. Where to plant chrysanthemum?
    Chrysanthemums should be planted in full sun and in well-draining soil. They can be planted in containers or in the ground.
  8. How to propagate chrysanthemum?
    Chrysanthemums can be propagated from cuttings, division, or seeds. Cuttings and division are the most common methods.
  9. How to overwinter chrysanthemum?
    In colder climates, chrysanthemums can be overwintered by covering them with a layer of mulch or moving them indoors to a cool, dark location.
  10. What does a chrysanthemum symbolise?
    In many cultures, chrysanthemums are associated with death and are often used in funeral arrangements. In other cultures, they symbolize happiness, joy, and longevity.
  11. How to make chrysanthemum tea?
    To make chrysanthemum tea, steep dry chrysanthemum flowers in hot water for several minutes. The resulting tea is said to have a light, floral flavour and a range of health benefits.
Show More Show Less

Cedar

Cedar is a coniferous evergreen tree with attractive foliage that is known for its durability and resistance to insects. The tree prefers a sunny location with well-drained soil and can grow up to 40 meters tall. It is commonly used in large gardens and parks.

cedar tree
  • Genus: Cedrus
  • Family: Pinaceae
  • Ideal conditions: Well-drained soil, full sun to partial shade
  • Light levels: Full sun to partial shade
  • Soil type: Well-drained soil with pH 6.5 to 7.5
  • Garden position: Suitable for borders, specimens, and woodland gardens
  • Flowering season: Cones form in the autumn, mature in 2-3 years
  • Pruning season: Prune in late winter or early spring before new growth appears
  • Planting season: Plant in the autumn or early spring when the soil is workable
  • Care instructions: Water regularly during the first growing season, fertilize in spring with a slow-release fertiliser, mulch to retain moisture, protect from strong winds, and avoid high-nitrogen fertilizers.
  • Hardiness: USDA zones 6-9, RHS H6 (hardy down to -10°C)

Cedar trees have a rich history and cultural significance. The wood from cedar trees has been used for thousands of years for construction, furniture, and various other purposes. Cedar was especially prized in ancient times for its durability, resistance to decay, and pleasant scent.

In some cultures, cedar has been used for its medicinal properties, such as its ability to repel insects and treat skin conditions. Native American tribes used cedar in various rituals and ceremonies, believing that the tree had powerful spiritual properties. Cedar was also used to build totem poles and other structures, as well as for medicinal purposes.

In many cultures, cedar has also been associated with the idea of protection and purification. For example, in ancient Egypt, cedar oil was used in the mummification process. In Biblical times, cedar wood was used to build the Temple of Solomon and was considered a symbol of strength and stability.

Today, cedar is still highly valued for its wood, which is used in everything from outdoor furniture and decking to indoor panelling and closet liners. It is also often used in aromatherapy and as an insect repellent.

Cedar FAQs

  1. What is cedar wood used for?
    Cedar wood is commonly used for making furniture, cabinets, and panelling due to its attractive natural colour and durability. It is also used for outdoor construction such as fencing, decking, and shingles due to its resistance to rot and insects. Cedarwood is also used in the production of essential oils and fragrances.
  2. What colour is cedar?
    Cedarwood ranges from a light, yellowish-brown to a dark, reddish-brown colour, depending on the species.
  3. Which country has a cedar tree on its national flag?
    Lebanon has a cedar tree on its national flag. The cedar tree is a symbol of strength, prosperity, and beauty in Lebanese culture.
  4. What does a cedar tree look like?
    Cedar trees are conifers that typically have a conical shape, with branches that spread out horizontally. They have needle-like or scale-like foliage that is often fragrant. The bark is usually greyish-brown and fibrous.
  5. What does cedar smell like?
    Cedar has a distinctive, sweet and woody aroma. It is often used in the production of perfumes, incense, and other fragrances.
  6. What type of wood is cedar?
    Cedar is a type of softwood, which means it comes from evergreen trees that have needles rather than leaves. It is known for its natural resistance to rot, insects, and decay.
  7. What is cedar used for?
    Cedar is commonly used for making furniture, cabinetry, panelling, fencing, decking, and shingles. It is also used in the production of essential oils and fragrances.
  8. Where does cedar wood come from?
    Cedar trees are native to many parts of the world, including North America, Europe, and Asia. Different species of cedar are found in different regions and climates.
  9. Where do cedar trees grow?
    Cedar trees grow in a variety of habitats, from temperate to tropical climates. Some species prefer well-drained soil, while others can tolerate wet or rocky soils.
  10. How to plant a cedar tree?
    To plant a cedar tree, select a site with well-drained soil and plenty of sunlight. Dig a hole that is slightly larger than the root ball of the tree, and backfill the hole with soil. Water the tree well after planting and regularly thereafter, especially during the first year.
  11. How to grow a cedar tree?
    Cedar trees grow best in well-drained soil and full sunlight. Water them regularly, especially during the first year, and apply a balanced fertilizer in early spring. Prune as needed to maintain shape and remove dead or damaged branches.
  12. How deep are cedar tree roots?
    Cedar tree roots can extend up to three times the height of the tree, which means that they can reach depths of 30 feet or more, depending on the size of the tree.
  13. How to plant a cedar tree in a pot?
    To plant a cedar tree in a pot, select a container that is at least twice the size of the root ball. Fill the container with well-draining potting soil, and add slow-release fertilizer. Place the tree in the centre of the pot and backfill it with soil. Water well after planting and regularly thereafter.
  14. What type of tree is the cedar of Lebanon?
    The cedar of Lebanon (Cedrus libani) is a large evergreen tree that is native to the mountains of the Eastern Mediterranean region. It is known for its broad, spreading branches and its iconic role in the history and culture of Lebanon.
Show More Show Less

Crab apple

Crab apple is a small deciduous tree that produces beautiful spring flowers and colourful fruit in autumn. The tree prefers a sunny location with well-drained soil and can grow up to 8 meters tall. It is commonly used in small gardens and as a feature tree.

CRAB APPLE BLOSSOM
  • Genus: Malus
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Ideal conditions: Prefers full sun to partial shade and well-drained soil.
  • Light levels: Full sun to partial shade.
  • Soil type: Well-drained soil.
  • Garden position: Suitable for hedgerows and ornamental gardens.
  • Flowering season: Spring (April-May).
  • Pruning season: Late winter to early spring (February-March).
  • Planting season: Late autumn to early spring (November-March).
  • Care instructions: Water regularly in the first year of growth, fertilize in the spring and prune to maintain shape and remove dead or diseased branches.
  • Hardiness: USDA zones 4-8 and RHS H6 (hardy down to -20°C or -4°F).

Crab apples have a long history of use as a food source and as a medicinal plant. They are thought to have originated in Central Asia and have been cultivated for thousands of years. The fruit of the crab apple tree was a popular food for Native Americans and early settlers in North America. The fruit was used to make jellies, jams, and cider, and was also eaten fresh.

In addition to its culinary uses, the crab apple tree has a number of cultural and symbolic meanings. In many cultures, the crab apple tree is associated with love, fertility, and youth. In Norse mythology, the goddess Idunn was said to have kept a box of golden apples that kept the gods young and immortal. In Celtic mythology, the crab apple tree was associated with the goddess Rhiannon and was said to have the power to grant wishes.

In Chinese culture, the crab apple is associated with happiness and good fortune and is often used in traditional medicine. The fruit of the crab apple is also a popular ingredient in Japanese cuisine, where it is used to make a type of vinegar and a sweet jelly called marmalade.

In more modern times, the crab apple has become a popular ornamental tree in gardens and parks, prized for its beautiful spring blossoms, colourful fruit, and hardy nature. It is also a popular bonsai tree, prized for its small size and delicate, gnarled branches.

Crab Apple FAQs

  1. What does a crab apple look like?
    A crab apple tree typically has a rounded shape and produces small, tart fruit that can be red, yellow, or green in colour. The leaves are often oval-shaped with serrated edges.
  2. When to prune crab apple?
    The best time to prune a crab apple tree is in late winter or early spring, while the tree is still dormant.
  3. How to make crab apple jelly UK?
    To make crab apple jelly, you will need to wash and roughly chop the crab apples, and then simmer them in water until they are soft. The mixture is then strained through a jelly bag, and the resulting juice is combined with sugar and boiled until it reaches the setting point. The jelly is then poured into sterilized jars and allowed to cool.
  4. How to prune a crab apple tree?
    To prune a crab apple tree, you should remove any dead or diseased branches first. Then, you can thin out the interior of the tree to improve air circulation and reduce the risk of disease. You can also shape the tree by removing any branches that are growing in the wrong direction or are crossing over other branches.
  5. When to prune crab apple trees?
    As mentioned earlier, the best time to prune a crab apple tree is in late winter or early spring, while the tree is still dormant.
  6. When does crab apple blossom?
    Crab apple trees typically bloom in spring, usually in April or May, depending on the climate and location. The blossoms are usually pink or white and can be quite showy.
Show More Show Less

Concluding this article

In conclusion, gardening is a wonderful hobby that not only beautifies our surroundings but also has numerous health and mental benefits. Whether you are a seasoned gardener or just starting out, incorporating plants into your daily life can have a positive impact on your well-being.

We hope this article has provided you with a helpful overview of ten popular plants that are perfect for any garden. Remember, each plant has its own unique needs and requirements, so be sure to do your research before choosing which plants to include in your garden.

If you want to learn more about gardening, we recommend checking out some of the websites listed below for further reading and information. Additionally, you can follow our blog for more articles like this, and subscribe to our newsletter to stay up to date with the latest posts and tips.

Further reading

Here are some helpful websites for further reading:

We wish you the best of luck in your gardening adventures and hope that these plants bring you many years of joy and beauty in your garden.

Share this to:

Similar Posts